Is the Logitech G Pro worth $100? Our gaming mouse review 

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Is the Logitech G Pro worth its high price of around $100? We review the $100 Logitech G Pro gaming mouse to see if it’s worth that high asking price.

Logitech’s extensive catalog of gaming mice may be the biggest among major manufacturers. From the humble G203 to the flagship G Pro X Superlight, the company offers something to gamers at nearly every price point. In the case of the $100 market, Logitech offers the wireless G Pro. While overall a great choice, the G Pro does have a few catches that every prospective buyer should know about.

If you’re looking for a quick review of the Logitech G Pro gaming mouse:

As a gaming mouse targeted at enthusiasts, the G Pro delivers excellent hardware alongside Logitech’s excellent material quality. Great battery life and button customization make the ambidextrous mouse comfortable for almost any grip with either hand. The overall product gets a few points deducted for passable RGB and a disappointing scroll wheel, but it’s still a great choice at its price point compared to its competitors.

The target audience for the Logitech G Pro

Logitech claims that it developed the G Pro over two years while collaborating with multiple professional esports players. Despite that, the G Pro is notably aimed not at pro players, but rather amatuer enthusiasts. The emphasis on the sensor and battery life further point to tactical FPS players. 

Valorant and Counter-Strike: Global Offensive players have the most to gain, but players of Dota 2, League of Legends, and many other games can also benefit from the comfortable ergonomics and long battery life. At around $100, the G Pro’s biggest wireless competitors are the Razer Basilisk Ultimate and SteelSeries Aerox 9.

Logitech G Pro promises big specs and features

Let’s start with the visual parts of the Logitech G Pro. It has a fairly standard shape that is meant to work for both right and left-handed users. The G Pro has a set of forward and back buttons on each side that can cleverly detach from the mouse. The main RGB area is the Logitech logo on the front, which lights up very similarly to the Logitech G403. The logo glows a single custom color that can be customized via hex code.

When it comes to buttons, the Logitech G Pro strikes a good balance between quality and customization. The left and right click both feel firm with rigid plastic after 18 months of use. The side buttons feel good, and they’ve yet to malfunction in our experience. They connect firmly to both sides, and you can even use all four at once. It becomes somewhat less comfortable this way, but it’s an important option for MMORPG or RTS players.

All Logitech mice offer integration with Overwolf, Discord, and OBS. By connecting services through Logitech G Hub, players can activate overlays and change stream settings with the press of a mouse button. We didn’t test this feature much during our time with the mouse, but it could be useful for some gamers.

As for the internals, the G Pro houses a proprietary HERO 25K sensor, meaning it can accurately scale up to 25,000 DPI. It’s probably best for most users to stay under 1,000. As for the polling rate, Logitech actually lags behind competitors at its price point with 1,000 Hertz. That’s enough for heavy gaming, but Logitech has yet to unveil a rival for other companies’ 8,000 Hz hyper-polling sensors.

Lastly, the Logitech G pro lists a 48-hour battery lifetime with RGB activated. Turning it off yields an extra 12 hours for a total of 60 hours. It takes a few hours to fully charge, but a quick 15-minute charge should be enough juice for a typical gaming session. The very front of the mouse houses a micro USB port that can function as a computer connection in emergency situations.

The best parts of the Logitech G Pro

A $100 gaming mouse is a luxury, but our review of the Logitech G Pro includes a long list of good reasons to buy.

The first thing users will notice is the rigid body. The mouse panels don’t bend and the tolerances for assembly are very tight. Our mouse displayed absolutely zero mechanical problems for the 18 months or so that we used it. Logitech earned marks for its build quality on the G403, and the G Pro upholds that standard.

The buttons are no slouches either. There are low activation points for the forward and back keys, which makes them difficult to hit on accident. They feel responsive and clicky, just like the main buttons. Replacing them is easy, and the marks left by their absence may even help with grip. The scroll wheel is lightly textured and firmly set in place, though it lacks the famous friction release of Logitech’s G502. 

Battery life is rarely the selling point of any gaming mouse, but over the course of our G Pro review, it appears that Logitech has greatly underrated the potential battery life. 60 hours seems like a low estimate even with RGB on. The Logitech G Pro often took well over two weeks to require a recharge. Even with the RGB turned on, the G Pro has excellent battery life betrayed by the box specifications.

Lastly, the Logitech G Pro’s ample size makes it a good choice for every kind of grip. A fingertip grip may seem uncomfortable at first, but the mouse is surprisingly light at just 80 grams. Palm and claw users should feel right at home with plenty of real estate on the sides to grab. The removable side buttons help accommodate anyone whose pinky tends to drift down.

Scroll wheel, RGB review for Logitech G Pro

There isn’t a lot wrong with the G Pro, but the few question marks stick out compared to the mouse’s positive traits.

The first thing that may disappoint purchasers is the mouse wheel. Logitech makes some fantastic mouse wheels, but this one simply doesn’t stand out in any way. It functions perfectly fine, with a uniform rubber grip with no friction release. Cheaper mice from the same company have mouse wheel RGB, but the G Pro is a notable exception in this regard.

The fact that there is only one RGB zone on the front of the mouse means that it’s rare to even see it. The three dots leading up to the mouse wheel are also customizable, but they’re small and will be covered by most grips.

How the Logitech G Pro stacks up to alternatives

Let’s review the specs of the Logitech G Pro compared to some of its competitors.

Logitech G ProRazer Basilisk UltimateSteelSeries Aerox 9
$99.99$79.99$105.99
AmbidextrousRight-handedRight-handed
80 gram weight107 gram weight89 gram weight
Logo RGBLogo, wheel, click RGBInternal RGB
1,000 Hz polling1,000 Hz polling1,000 Hz polling
Seven buttonsNine buttons16 buttons

The G Pro clearly stands out in terms of weight and accessibility. It’s the only choice of these three mice that works for a left-handed user, and it’s the lightest by a significant margin. It lacks any extra RGB options beyond the basic logo, but it hits the gold standard 1,000 Hertz polling rate.

G Pro hits a high note for everything important

With all the pros and cons measured up, the Logitech G Pro is a great choice for someone who is serious about in-game performance. It feels great in the hand, boasts excellent internal hardware, and stays powered for weeks at a time with RGB disabled. Here are some of the best qualities that could push someone to buy a Logitech G Pro. 

  • Excellent build quality
  • Outstanding battery life
  • Nice button customization
  • Ambidextrous
  • The Logitech G Pro is an excellent choice for a gamer who wants the absolute best performance from their mouse above all else. While it may lack a little bit in the looks department, it has great internals, fantastic build quality, and excellent battery life in its weight class. Overall, we recommend the Logitech G Pro to any gamer who is serious about the performance of their peripherals.
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